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Mark Ronson’s fingerprints are everywhere in pop music.

Whether he’s behind the board as a producer, penning earwormy hooks for some music’s biggest names, or employing a crate digger’s mindset to create his own records, you’d be hard-pressed to find something on your playlist that Ronson hasn’t touched. The seven-time GRAMMY winner might as well be considered the industry’s Kevin Bacon — he’s worthy of his own “six degrees” game.

Today, Ronson is on his way back to New York City from some time spent in the Hudson Valley — a much-need reprieve after a blockbuster summer that saw his Barbie movie soundtrack top charts around the world.

“I love this film so much and I did something I’ve never done before by executive producing and overseeing [its music],” he tells GRAMMY.com.

That Ronson still has things to check off his professional bucket list is something of a surprise. The stepson of Foreigner guitarist Mick Jones, Ronson got his start DJing in New York in the ’90s, bridging his twin loves of funk and hip-hop. In the latter part of the decade, Diddy hired Ronson to DJ several parties, thus opening up the then-twentysomething to a world of A-list talent. Ronson’s elite status only grew over decades — from DJing Paul McCartney’s wedding in 2011 (for which he refused to accept payment), to creating the ubiquitous hit “Uptown Funk,” and curating the final night of the iconic 2023 Montreux Jazz Festival.

Ronson has released five of his own albums — beginning with 2003’s Here Comes The Fuzz and up to 2019’s Late Night Feelings — each of which is a star-studded affair, featuring everyone from Miley Cryus and Camilla Cabello to Bruno Mars and Mary J. Blige (as well as the occasional lawsuit over interpolation and sampling). Over the years, he’s developed a cadre of session musicians and production collaborators, creating an incredibly pop savvy sound often built on horn-driven funk and soul.

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At the bedrock of Ronson’s production — and among his best-known works — is Amy Winehouse’s GRAMMY-winning album Back To Black. Since that 2006 release, Ronson has collaborated with an ever-increasing number of major acts, composing, arranging, producing, writing or playing on (and sometimes all of the above) works by Lady Gaga, Duran Duran, Dua Lipa, Adele, Queens of the Stone Age, and even Sir Paul himself.

Ronson will add another first to his list: author. A hybrid memoir and cultural history, the still-in-progress 93 ‘Til Infinity will cover the New York downtown club scene of Ronson’s salad days.

“It’s really fun to revisit that era, and it was a very specific time in DJing where DJs weren’t really famous,” he recalls. “There was no stage; sometimes the turntables were shoved in the corner at the end of the bar and you would have to crane your neck to even see the crowd. I sound like Grandpa Simpson, but I loved it.”

Ronson is en route to a DJ gig as we speak, though the new dad says he’ll be “kicking back into high gear on the book” soon. “[Writing it] requires really falling off for seven hours in the basement, like Stephen King says in his book. But I like that,” he says.

Ahead of a celebration of Barbie The Album at the GRAMMY Museum on Sept. 27, Mark Ronson shared the stories behind some of his favorite productions – including the song that makes people “stupidly happy.”

“Ooh Wee,” Here Comes The Fuzz feat. Ghostface Killah, Nate Dogg, Trife and Saigon (2003)