Presidential election, 2024

Presidential election, 2024

2024 Presidential ElectionDate: November 5, 2024Presidential candidates • Electoral College in the 2024 presidential election • PredictIt markets • Presidential debates • Timeline of announcements • Important dates • Presidential election by state • Campaign finance • Endorsements • Logos and slogans • Key staffers • Vice presidential candidates Democratic nomination Democratic National Convention, 2024 • Delegate rulesRepublican nomination Republican National Convention, 2024 • Delegate rules • Campaign travel • DebatesMinor party nominations Green Party • Libertarian PartyUse the dropdown menu below to read more about noteworthy candidatesBallotpedia’s presidential election coverage2024 • 2020 • 2016

The United States will hold its 60th presidential election on November 5, 2024. The winner of the 2024 presidential election will be sworn into office on January 20, 2025.

Click here for more information about the 2020 presidential election.

Click the links below to navigate to:

  • Upcoming dates and deadlines in the presidential election
  • Notable declared candidates and exploratory committees
  • Timeline of campaign announcements
  • Democratic presidential primary
  • Republican presidential primary
  • Electoral College in the 2024 presidential election
  • Presidential election competitiveness
  • Presidential election results by party, 1900-2020

Upcoming dates

See also: Important dates in the 2024 presidential race

This section is updated weekly on Fridays as information becomes available.

  • December 3, 2023: Filing deadline for Republican candidates in Idaho.[1]
  • December 5, 2023: Filing deadline for major party candidates in Tennessee.
  • December 6, 2023:
    • Filing deadline for major party candidates in Oklahoma.
    • Fourth Republican primary debate.
  • December 8, 2023: Filing deadline for major party candidates in Michigan.
  • December 11, 2023: Filing deadline for major party candidates in Arizona, Colorado, and Texas.

Notable declared candidates and exploratory committees

See also: Defining noteworthy presidential candidates (2024), How we order candidate lists

The following noteworthy candidates have filed to run for president with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) or announced exploratory committees. Click here to view a full list of all candidates who have filed with the FEC.

Democratic candidates

Presidential Elections-2016-badge.pngJoe Biden Presidential election, 2024Dean Phillips Presidential election, 2024Marianne Williamson

List of Democratic candidates

  • Joe Biden (D), incumbent president of the United States, announced he would run for re-election on April 25, 2023.[2]
  • Dean Phillips (D), a U.S. representative from Minnesota, announced his candidacy on October 26, 2023.[3]
  • Marianne Williamson (D), 2020 presidential candidate and author, announced her candidacy on February 23, 2023.[4]

Other Democratic candidates

  • Cenk Uygur (D), a media commentator and founder of The Young Turks, announced his candidacy on October 12, 2023. At the time of the announcement, it was not clear that Uygur met the natural born citizen requirement in Article II, Section 1, of the United States Constitution.[5]

Republican candidates

Presidential election, 2024Ryan Binkley Presidential election, 2024Chris Christie Presidential election, 2024Ron DeSantis Nikki Haley Asa Hutchinson Vivek Ramaswamy Presidential election, 2024Donald Trump

List of Republican candidates

  • Ryan Binkley (R), a businessman and pastor, announced his candidacy on April 23, 2023.[6]
  • Chris Christie (R), former governor of New Jersey, announced his candidacy on June 6, 2023.[7]
  • Ron DeSantis (R), the governor of Florida, announced his candidacy on May 24, 2023.[8]
  • Nikki Haley (R), former U.N. Ambassador and South Carolina Governor, announced her candidacy on February 14, 2023.[9]
  • Asa Hutchinson (R), former Arkansas Governor, announced his candidacy on April 2, 2023.[10]
  • Vivek Ramaswamy (R), entrepreneur and political commentator, announced his candidacy on February 21, 2023.[11]
  • Donald Trump (R), former U.S. President, announced his candidacy on November 15, 2022.[12]

Withdrawn Republican candidates

  • Doug Burgum (R), the governor of North Dakota, announced his candidacy on June 7, 2023.[13] Burgum withdrew from the race on December 4, 2023.[14]
  • Larry Elder (R), a talk radio host and 2021 California gubernatorial candidate, announced his candidacy on April 20, 2023.[15] Elder suspended his campaign on October 26, 2023.
  • Will Hurd (R), former U.S. Representative from Texas, announced his candidacy on June 22, 2023.[16] Hurd suspended his campaign on October 9, 2023.[17]
  • Perry Johnson (R), a business owner and author, announced his candidacy on March 2, 2023.[18] Johnson suspended his campaign on October 20, 2023.[19]
  • Mike Pence (R), former vice president of the United States, announced his candidacy on June 7, 2023.[20] Pence withdrew from the race on October 28, 2023.[21]
  • Tim Scott (R), a United States senator from South Carolina, announced his candidacy on May 22, 2023.[22] Scott withdrew from the race on November 12, 2023.[23]
  • Corey Stapleton (R), former Montana Secretary of State, announced his candidacy on November 11, 2022.[24] Stapleton withdrew from the race on October 13, 2023.[25]
  • Francis Suarez (R), the Mayor of Miami, announced his candidacy on June 15, 2023.[26] Suarez suspended his campaign on August 29, 2023.[27]
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Third party or independent candidates

See also: List of 2024 registered Green presidential candidates and List of 2024 registered Libertarian presidential candidates

  • Robert F. Kennedy Jr. (Independent), withdrew from the Democratic primary and announced he would run as an independent on October 9, 2023.[28]
  • Chase Oliver (Libertarian Party), a candidate in the 2022 Georgia U.S. Senate race, announced his candidacy on April 4, 2023.[29]
  • Jill Stein (Green Party), the 2016 Green Party presidential nominee, announced her candidacy on November 9, 2023.[30]
  • Cornel West (Independent), philosopher and activist, announced his candidacy on June 5, 2023.[31]

To view a list of politicians and public figures discussed in the media as potential candidates, click here.

Timeline of campaign announcements

  • December 4, 2023: North Dakota Governor Doug Burgum (R) suspended his presidential campaign.[14]
  • November 12, 2023: Tim Scott (R) suspended his presidential campaign.[23]
  • November 9, 2023: Jill Stein (G), the 2016 Green Party presidential nominee, announced her candidacy for the Green Party nomination.[32]
  • October 28, 2023: Former Vice President Mike Pence (R) suspended his presidential campaign.[33]
  • October 26, 2023: U.S. Rep. Dean Phillips (D-Minn.) announced his candidacy.[34]

Democratic presidential primary

See also: Democratic presidential nomination, 2024

The Democratic Party will select its presidential nominee at the 2024 Democratic National Convention, which will take place from August 19-22, 2024, in Chicago, Illinois.

Prior to the national convention, individual state caucuses and primaries are held to allocate convention delegates. To read more about the 2024 primary schedule click here. These delegates, along with superdelegates who come from the party leadership, vote at the convention to select the nominee.

Ballotpedia has identified the following noteworthy candidates seeking the Democratic nomination:

  • Joe Biden (D), incumbent president of the United States, announced he would run for re-election on April 25, 2023.[2]
  • Dean Phillips (D), a U.S. representative from Minnesota, announced his candidacy on October 26, 2023.[46]
  • Marianne Williamson (D), 2020 presidential candidate and author, announced her candidacy on February 23, 2023.[4]

Democratic primary debates

The Democratic Party said it did not plan to hold presidential primary debates.

Campaign finance in the Democratic presidential primary

The following chart displays noteworthy Democratic primary candidates’ overall fundraising through the October 2023 quarterly campaign finance reports. Note that the chart displays fundraising figures for candidates who had declared before the most recent reporting deadline. It only displays data for principal campaign committees, not candidate-affiliated PACs. The charts below include campaign finance reports beginning at the point the FEC starts classifying the committee as a presidential candidate’s principal campaign finance committee.

Receipts is a broad term referring to all money that goes into a campaign account, including contributions by individuals, dividends or interest on loans or investments made by the campaign, transfers of money from other political committees, and offsets to a campaign’s expenditures in the form of rebates or refunds. Contributions reflect individual donations to a campaign. Disbursements is a term for campaign spending.

Republican presidential primary

See also: Republican presidential nomination, 2024

The Republican Party will select its presidential nominee at the 2024 Republican National Convention, which will take place in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, from July 15-18, 2024. Before the convention, each state, Washington, D.C., and five U.S. territories will hold a primary, caucus, or convention to decide how to allocate delegates at the national convention. These nominating events typically begin in February of an election year, though 2024 primary dates are still uncertain.

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The Republican National Committee began holding primary debates in August 2023, with the first debate taking place in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.[47]

Ballotpedia has identified the following noteworthy candidates seeking the Republican nomination:

  • Ryan Binkley (R), a businessman and pastor, announced his candidacy on April 23, 2023.[48]
  • Chris Christie (R), former governor of New Jersey, announced his candidacy on June 6, 2023.[7]
  • Ron DeSantis (R), the governor of Florida, announced his candidacy on May 24, 2023.[8]
  • Nikki Haley (R), former U.N. Ambassador and South Carolina Governor, announced her candidacy on February 14, 2023.[9]
  • Asa Hutchinson (R), former Arkansas Governor, announced his candidacy on April 2, 2023.[10]
  • Vivek Ramaswamy (R), entrepreneur and political commentator, announced his candidacy on February 21, 2023.[11]
  • Donald Trump (R), former U.S. President, announced his candidacy on November 15, 2022.[12]

Republican primary debates

See also: Republican presidential primary debates, 2024

The following table provides an overview of the date, location, host, and number of participants in each scheduled 2024 Republican presidential primary debate.

2024 Republican presidential primary debates Debate Date Location Host Number of participants First Republican primary debate August 23, 2023 Milwaukee, Wisconsin[49] Fox News[50] 8 Second Republican primary debate September 27, 2023 Simi Valley, California[51] Fox Business, Univision 7 Third Republican primary debate November 8, 2023 Miami, Florida[52] NBC News, Salem Radio Network 5 Fourth Republican primary debate December 6, 2023 Tuscaloosa, Alabama[53] NewsNation, The Megyn Kelly Show, the Washington Free Beacon 4 On December 7, 2023, CNN reported the RNC would lift its ban on non-RNC sanctioned debates.[54]Fifth Republican primary debate January 10, 2024 Des Moines, Iowa[54] CNN TBD Sixth Republican primary debate January 18, 2024 Manchester, New Hampshire[55] ABC News, WMUR-TV, New Hampshire Republican State Committee TBD Seventh Republican primary debate January 21, 2024 Goffstown, New Hampshire[54] CNN TBD

Campaign finance in the Republican presidential primary

See also: Presidential election campaign finance, 2024

The following chart displays noteworthy Republican primary candidates’ overall fundraising through the October 2023 quarterly campaign finance reports. Note that the chart displays fundraising figures for candidates who had declared before the most recent reporting deadline. It only displays data for principal campaign committees, not candidate-affiliated PACs. The charts below include campaign finance reports beginning at the point the FEC starts classifying the committee as a presidential candidate’s principal campaign finance committee.

Receipts is a broad term referring to all money that goes into a campaign account, including contributions by individuals, dividends or interest on loans or investments made by the campaign, transfers of money from other political committees, and offsets to a campaign’s expenditures in the form of rebates or refunds. Contributions reflect individual donations to a campaign. Disbursements is a term for campaign spending.

Endorsements in the Republican presidential primary

See also: Presidential election endorsements, 2024

The following chart shows the total number of noteworthy endorsements each Republican presidential candidate has received.

General election debates

See also: Presidential debates, 2024

The following table provides an overview of the date, location, and host in each scheduled 2024 general election debate.

2024 general election debates Debate Date Location Host First presidential debate September 16, 2024 San Marcos, Texas Texas State University Vice presidential debate September 25, 2024 Easton, Pennsylvania Lafayette College Second presidential debate October 1, 2024 Petersburg, Virginia Virginia State University Third presidential debate October 9, 2024 Salt Lake City, Utah The University of Utah

Presidential election key staff

See also: Presidential election key staffers, 2024

Campaign staff plays an important role in the presidential primaries. The makeup of a candidate’s staff can signal the strength of their support from influential party activists and whether they are aligning with a particular faction or group within the party. Eric Appleman of Democracy in Action describes candidates’ efforts to hire staffers as a “race for talent, both nationally and in key early states.” He adds, “The goal is to assemble a team of top talent that can work together effectively to mobilize resources, boost the candidate and his or her message, and ultimately secure the party’s nomination.”[56]

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Presidential candidates will typically have a national staff, which is overseen by a campaign manager and assisted by political consultants, senior advisors, professional polling firms, and key stakeholders such as interest group leaders and major financial supporters. They also build organizations in individual states that are overseen by state directors and staffed by party activists and political professionals well-versed in the particular politics of the area. Candidates often appoint elected officials and other important figures in their party’s coalition as chairs of their national campaign and state-level campaigns.[56]

Click here for an overview of key staff by presidential campaign.

Electoral College

See also: Electoral College in the 2024 presidential election

The Electoral College is the process by which the states and District of Columbia elect the president of the United States. Each state is represented by a number of electors equal to the size of its congressional delegation. There are 538 electors in total. To win the Electoral College, a candidate must receive a majority—at least 270—electoral votes.[57]

Thirteen states gained or lost electoral votes following the 2020 Census:[58]

  • Texas gained two votes.
  • Colorado, Florida, Montana, North Carolina, and Oregon each gained one.
  • California, Illinois, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia each lost one.

Although there is no constitutional provision or federal law requiring electors to vote in accordance with the election results in their state, electors typically vote for their state’s popular vote winner. Some states have provisions permitting the disqualification and replacement of an elector whose vote deviates from the state’s popular vote. There were no faithless electors in 2020.[59]

The following map shows the number of electoral votes per state in the 2024 presidential election.

Presidential election competitiveness

Polling

The section below displays national polling averages for the 2024 Democratic and Republican presidential nominations from RealClearPolitics.

Prediction markets

The section below displays national PredictIt share prices and RealClearPolitics prediction market averages for the 2024 Democratic and Republican presidential nominations.

What is a prediction market?

Prediction markets allow users to purchase shares relating to the outcome of events using real money. Each event, such as an election, has a number of contracts associated with it, each correlating to a different outcome. For instance, an election contested between four candidates would be represented by eight separate contracts, with each contract correlating to a particular candidate winning or losing the election.

The share price in each individual forecast rises and falls based on market demand. Once the event’s outcome is decided, holders of shares that correlate with the correct outcome receive a payout for each share they held.

For example, a user buys 10 shares at 20 cents each in a presidential primary saying Candidate A will win. If Candidate A wins the election, the user earns $10. If the candidate loses, the user earns no money and loses his original $2 investment.

Why do prediction markets matter?

Prediction markets can be used to gain insight into the outcome of elections. Microsoft Research economist David Rothschild argued that they are better suited to the task than polls: “I can create a poll that can mimic everything about a prediction market…except markets have a way of incentivizing you to come back at 2 a.m. and update your answer.”[60][61][62]

PredictIt

The chart below shows 2024 Democratic presidential primary open share prices over time.[63]

RealClearPolitics prediction market averages

PredictIt

The chart below shows 2024 Republican presidential primary open share prices over time.[64]

RealClearPolitics prediction market averages

Presidential election results by party, 1900-2020

See also: Presidential voting history by state

This table lists presidential election results by party for each state in every presidential election held between 1900 and 2020.

See also

  • Presidential candidates, 2024
  • List of registered 2024 presidential candidates

Footnotes

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